4

Chapters

10

Sidebars

3

Appendices

6

Guides

Sample topics

Avoiding ISBN Pitfalls

Choosing CreateSpace ISBNs

Copyright Page Contents & Filing Explained

Library of Congress Demystified

Maximizing SEO Benefits

Barcode Fundamentals

Sample content

Select the content, then use the slider bar to scroll down the page. (Does not work on all mobile devices.)


Table of Contents

Preface
1. What Book Registration Is, and Why It Matters

  • Who this book is for
  • It doesn’t matter, until it matters
  • How to use this book
  • Website Links
  • Book or eBook?

2. The International Standard Book Number

  • Ten ISBN fundamentals
  • Twenty-three frequently asked questions
  • CreateSpace and ISBNs
  • IngramSpark and ISBNs
  • Buying and using your ISBN

3. Barcodes

  • When you do not need a barcode
  • When you do need a barcode
  • CreateSpace and barcodes
  • IngramSpark and barcodes
  • How to produce a barcode
  • Where to place the barcode
  • Deciphering a barcode

4. Copyright

  • Why filing for a copyright is important
  • Preparing to register a copyright
  • How to format your copyright page
  • Sample copyright legal notices

5. Library of Congress

  • Understanding the two programs: CIP and PCN
  • Is it worth the effort and potential expense?
  • Applying for and using an LCCN, a two-step process
  • Optional Step 3: Why, when and how to get a P-CIP data block

The Bare Minimum

Appendices

  • Appendix A: Timing and Timelines
  • Appendix B: Maximizing SEO Benefits
  • Appendix C: The Seven Habits of Smart Metadata Managers

Resources

  • Where to buy ISBNs
  • Converting ISBNs
  • How to create short links to your book or eBook
  • eBook ISBN requirements by distributor and store
  • Deciphering an ISBN
  • Further reading about ISBNs
  • Glossary

Amazon Kindle Metadata Optimization Offer

Index
Notes
Acknowledgments
About the Author

Table of Contents

Preface
1. What Book Registration Is, and Why It Matters

  • Who this book is for
  • It doesn’t matter, until it matters
  • How to use this book
  • Website Links
  • Book or eBook?

2. The International Standard Book Number

  • Ten ISBN fundamentals
  • Twenty-three frequently asked questions
  • CreateSpace and ISBNs
  • IngramSpark and ISBNs
  • Buying and using your ISBN

3. Barcodes

  • When you do not need a barcode
  • When you do need a barcode
  • CreateSpace and barcodes
  • IngramSpark and barcodes
  • How to produce a barcode
  • Where to place the barcode
  • Deciphering a barcode

4. Copyright

  • Why filing for a copyright is important
  • Preparing to register a copyright
  • How to format your copyright page
  • Sample copyright legal notices

5. Library of Congress

  • Understanding the two programs: CIP and PCN
  • Is it worth the effort and potential expense?
  • Applying for and using an LCCN, a two-step process
  • Optional Step 3: Why, when and how to get a P-CIP data block

The Bare Minimum

Appendices

  • Appendix A: Timing and Timelines
  • Appendix B: Maximizing SEO Benefits
  • Appendix C: The Seven Habits of Smart Metadata Managers

Resources

  • Where to buy ISBNs
  • Converting ISBNs
  • How to create short links to your book or eBook
  • eBook ISBN requirements by distributor and store
  • Deciphering an ISBN
  • Further reading about ISBNs
  • Glossary

Amazon Kindle Metadata Optimization Offer

Index
Notes
Acknowledgments
About the Author

Preface and Introduction

Preface

For the first time in modern history, authors have a choice. Freed from the domination of traditional publishers, independent publishing is now a viable option. The greatest stumbling block that remains for most indie publishers is making sense of the registration process that enables the sale and protection of books.

That’s where I can help you.

This guide will save you from sorting through blogs and message boards that contain contradictory statements and misinformed opinions. It will save you the heartache of launching a book without fully understanding the ramifications of your choices for assigning an ISBN, or the proper elements of a copyright page and its filing. Finally, you can avoid wading through arcane government website pages to learn the requirements, process and timing required to obtain a Library of Congress Control Number.

My goal is to help simplify the publication process. Registration is one of the few steps in book publishing in which mistakes and oversights are difficult and costly to correct. These pages explain your options, advise possible courses of action, and help you avoid the consequences of actions not taken.

Register Your Book presents the essential information any United States-based publisher needs to succeed. Think of it as your personal publishing consultant.

To your publishing success,
David Wogahn
Carlsbad, California

1
What Book Registration
Is, and Why It Matters

Book registration is not a formal requirement, nor a defined procedure for every book. Anyone can print a book or produce an eBook and distribute it. You do not need to complete any paperwork or online forms or spend any money. However, if you wish to distribute, sell, and protect your book, there are three separate registrations that all books have in common:

  1. ISBN (International Standard Book
    Number) Registration
  2. U.S. Copyright Registration
  3. U.S. Library of Congress Registration

Who might be able to ignore these registrations? Perhaps the fiction writer publishing exclusively in eBook format who doesn’t care about copyright. But for the vast majority of us who don’t fit that description, one or more of these registrations is important, if not mandatory, to publish a book.

Following the advice in this book, no one will be able to tell the difference between your book and a book produced by one of the “big New York” publishers. Besides simply appearing professional, your book can be:

  • Listed in the same industry databases
  • Sold in any store that wishes to sell your book
  • More easily (and less expensively) be defended in the event of a copyright violation

Your book will also be more discoverable by those looking for books like yours: stores, libraries and most importantly, readers. No matter how you describe it, in Internet marketing-speak, no book or author stands a chance at success without being visible and discoverable to readers searching online. And let’s face it, with more and more brick-and-mortar stores closing, book shoppers are making more and more of their purchases online.

Never before has there been a more compelling reason for making sure a book and its author are properly represented in as many online data- bases as possible. A thorough book registration process ensures that. Proper book registration will greatly reduce the chance of problems for many years to come.

Who this book is for

The ease of publishing and the potential for income from it have brought literally thousands of new books to the virtual shelves of online bookstores. According to R.R. Bowker, the exclusive seller of ISBNs in the United States, ISBNs for self-published print and eBook titles have grown from 85,468 in 2008 to 458,564 in 2013, the most recent year reported. That’s a 537% increase! And the actual numbers are even greater because Bowker doesn’t count eBooks published without an ISBN.

As you may know, the big eBook retailers like Amazon do not require publishers to use an ISBN. And because none of the large online self-publishing portals report the number of new eBooks published, no one knows just how many new eBooks are published each year without an ISBN. Suffice to say, it has to be thousands.

Numbers and growth aside, what’s obvious is that we have a highly competitive marketplace. This makes it especially important for new publishers to utilize every industry program and procedure available.

Register Your Book aims to assist the range of people seeking to navigate the complicated world of self-publishing:

  • Self-publishers who want to avoid looking “self-published” and get their book into the same databases as the big publishers use.
  • Authors who want to understand their options even if they are not the one designing and producing their book.
  • Publishing services firms who want to help their clients look even more professional and guide them through these important steps.
  • New publishers who need to establish best practices that will serve their publishing firm for years to come.

It doesn’t matter, until it matters

We publish with the goal of being successful, whether that means selling books, touching lives, recording family histories, or enhancing our reputations. But all of that is put at risk when we take shortcuts or miss important details.

Publishing a book is a journey culminating in an event. Once released into the world, your book is on its own. Do-overs and corrections are expensive, if not impossible.

Consider ISBNs. Numbers cannot be transferred, so if you got a free one and later want to show your name as the publisher, you will have to re-publish your book using a new ISBN. And that usually means starting over to accumulate reader reviews.

You might discover a book very similar to yours selling in the U.S. or another country, but now the cost to protect your copyright has ballooned from $35 to thousands of dollars.

Or—surprise—a chance media mention generates interest in your book, but libraries and schools can’t easily find it. Because it is already published, your book is ineligible to receive a Library of Congress Control Number.

My point is that as publishers, we need to plan for success. Publishing a book is like baking a loaf of bread. Once out of the oven, the ingredients are baked in, and it’s off to the shelf for sale. Your book’s registration information never changes.

How to use this book

Register Your Book seeks to address both the why, as well as the how questions that new or occasional publishers have. If you are new to publishing, I recommend that you read the book but skim the how-to sections on your first time through. Don’t get bogged down trying to complete each step of the process as you read it. Registering your book requires a good deal of thinking and decision-making, so it’s best to understand the big picture before you get started.

After your initial read, turn to Appendix A, Timing and Timelines, where I summarize how long a process takes as well as the general order of each registration step. Each step references the appropriate chapter, which you can reread as you now complete a step in the process.

Website Links

Each step of the registration process is completed online, and that is where you will find all of the additional website resources referenced in this book. To make accessing these resources easier for both printed book and eBook readers, I replaced each of the specific links with an easy-to-read short link that takes you to the same place.

Each link begins with the domain name breve.link (breve meaning short in Italian). For example, when you type or click http://breve.link/ryb1, you will be taken to the Bowker website page for title submissions: http://www.bowker.com/tools-resources/ Title-Submissions.html.

Not only does this make a long website address easier to read and type (especially helpful for print book readers), but, in the event an address changes, we can easily update the link which keeps your book accurate and up-to-date. Please email the publisher if a link is broken or goes to what you think is the wrong location. That way it can be quickly fixed for all readers.

Book or eBook?

As you read on, keep in mind that I use the term book to describe all forms of a book—paper, digital, audio—unless referring specifically to the eBooks sold by major online book retailers. And by eBooks, I mean Kindle and EPUB formats, not PDF or any of the other dozen or so eBook formats.

My personal opinion is that we as publishers are doing our readers and profession a disservice if we treat eBooks as a second-class format. An eBook can and should be as professionally produced a work as any other type of book. We need to be careful that we don’t create a lesser product in the minds of today’s readers.

To this last point, if you are publishing books—whether the “p,” the “e” or the “a” (audio) variety—and assigning them an ISBN, do it right. An ISBN is inherently helpful for sales, but only if you take advantage of everything it offers.

Let’s begin with the most important registration step, the International Standard Book Number, or ISBN.

Sidebars

  1. Protecting Book Reviews
  2. Different eBooks Need Different ISBNs
  3. CreateSpace and IngramSpark for the Same Book
  4. Same Book; One in Color, the Other Black and White
  5. Bulk Upload ISBN Metadata
  6. Book Cover Templates
  7. Should You Preregister a Copyright on Your Book?
  8. Marketing to Libraries
  9. A Note about Permanent Paper
  10. MARC Records, OCLC WorldCat, SkyRiver

Index

Index

A
AaronGraphics, 55–56
aBooks (audio books), 14, 21–22, 24
Advance Reading Copies (ARCs), 37, 52, 54
“All Rights Reserved,” 68
Amazon
ASIN (Amazon Standard Identification Number), 10, 115–116, 121
CreateSpace. see CreateSpace
eBooks (electronic books), 10, 14, 21–22, 115–116, 124–125
ISBN (International Standard Book Number), 10, 19–20, 116
Mobi/Kindle, 14, 21–22, 115–116, 124–125
pBooks (print books), 116
searches, 101–102
Apple, 10, 19, 20, 117
ASIN (Amazon Standard Identification Number), 10, 115–116, 121. see also identification numbers
audio books (aBooks), 14, 21–22, 24

B
Baker & Taylor, 29–30, 31, 35
Barcode Graphics, 55–56
barcodes, 51–58. see also identification numbers
AaronGraphics, 55–56
Barcode Graphics, 55–56
Bowker, R. R. /MyIdentifiers.com, 40, 55
costs of, 51, 55
CreateSpace, 51, 53–54
defined, 121
Ingram/IngramSpark, 51, 53, 54–55
ISBN (International Standard Book Number), 40, 53–55, 57
placement of, 56
price data, 53–55, 57
sources of, 51, 52, 55–56
UPC (Universal Product Code), 121, 126
when to use, 52–53
Barnes & Noble
CreateSpace Expanded Distribution, 29
eBooks (electronic books), 19, 115, 116–117
ISBN (International Standard Book Number), 19, 115, 116–117
Berne Convention, 68
BISG (Book Industry Study Group), 121. see also standards, publishing
Books in Print, 13, 16, 104
Bowker, R. R. /MyIdentifiers.com
barcodes, 40, 55
Books in Print, 13, 16, 104
defined, 121–122
ISBN (International Standard Book Number), 3, 19, 32–35, 36, 38–45, 47–49, 121–122
Buenos Aires Convention, 68

C
Canada, 18
Cataloging in Publication (CIP) program. see CIP (Cataloging in Publication) program
check digit, 25, 114, 119, 122
CIP (Cataloging in Publication) program. see also PCN (Preassigned Control Number) program
on copyright page, 80
eligibility for, 80–81
LC-CIP data block, 83–84
for libraries, 80, 83–84, 90–93
P-CIP data block, 83–84, 90–93
copyright, 59–78. see also identification numbers
advantages of, 60–62
“All Rights Reserved,” 68
Berne Convention, 68
Buenos Aires Convention, 68
contacts, registered, 64–65
contributor listing, 71
Copyright Basics, 60–61, 67
copyright mark, 67
copyright page, 45–46, 66–77, 80, 82, 93
costs of, 5, 59–60, 62, 63, 65
environmental notices, 71–72
foreign distribution, 68
Green Press Initiative, 71–72
imprints, 123
infringements of, 60–61, 62
vs. ISBN (International Standard Book Number), 17, 25
legal notices, 72–77
“poor man’s copyright,” 62
preregistration, 65–66
Printer’s Key, 70–71
registration of/filing of, 59–65
Single Application, 63
U.S. Customs Service, 61
CreateSpace. see also Amazon; Ingram/IngramSpark
barcodes, 51, 53–54
book cover templates, 56
CreateSpace Direct, 29
Expanded Distribution, 28–30, 37–38
ISBN (International Standard Book Number), 12–13, 18–19, 19–20, 28–35
Libraries and Academic Institutions channel, 29–30

D
databases. see metadata
Digital Rights Management (DRM), 24, 122
discovery. see also marketing
defined, 122–123
metadata, 88, 102, 123
P-CIP data block, 91
registration, 2–3
SEO (Search Engine Optimization), 102–105, 125
distributors & resellers. see also publishers
Baker & Taylor, 29–30, 31, 35
CreateSpace. see CreateSpace
Ingram/IngramSpark. see Ingram/IngramSpark
ISBN (International Standard Book Number), 10, 11, 12, 16, 21, 27, 36, 118
DRM (Digital Rights Management), 24, 122

E
eBooks (electronic books)
Amazon. see Amazon
Apple, 10, 117
ASIN (Amazon Standard Identification Number), 10, 115–116
Barnes & Noble, 115, 116–117
CIP (Cataloging in Publication) program, 80–81, 83–84, 90–93
copyright. see copyright
DRM (Digital Rights Management), 24, 122
EPUB, 11, 21–22, 123
Ingram/IngramSpark. see Ingram/IngramSpark
ISBN (International Standard Book Number), 11–12, 15, 16, 19, 20, 21–22, 24–25, 26–27, 115, 116, 117, 118
LCCN (Library of Congress Control Number). see LCCN (Library of Congress Control Number)
LoC (Library of Congress). see LoC (Library of Congress)
Mobi/Kindle, 14, 21–22, 115–116, 124–125
PCN (Preassigned Control Number) program, 81–83, 85–88
registration. see registration
electronic books. see eBooks (electronic books)
EPUB, 11, 21–22, 123. see also Mobi/Kindle

G
Google, 19, 101–102
Green Press Initiative, 71–72

I
identification numbers. see also barcodes; copyright; metadata
ASIN (Amazon Standard Identification Number), 10, 115–116, 121
ISBN. see ISBN (International Standard Book Number)
ISSN (International Standard Serial Number), 124
LCCN (Library of Congress Control Number), 5, 70, 81–83, 85–90, 98–99
UPC (Universal Product Code), 121, 126
IDPF (International Digital Publishing Forum), 123. see also standards, publishing
imprints, 123
Ingram/IngramSpark. see also CreateSpace
barcodes, 51, 53, 54–55
book cover templates, 56–57
distribution, 29, 30, 37–38, 118
ISBN (International Standard Book Number), 18–19, 35–38
Lightning Source, 30, 35
International Digital Publishing Forum (IDPF), 123
International Organization for Standardization (ISO), 25–26
International Standard Book Number (ISBN). see ISBN (International Standard Book Number)
International Standard Serial Number (ISSN), 124
ISBN (International Standard Book Number), 9–50. see also identification numbers
aBooks (audio books), 14, 21–22, 24
Advance Reading Copies (ARCs), 37, 54
Amazon, 10, 19–20, 116
Apple, 10, 20, 117
assignment, 14–15, 40–44. see also ISBN: registration
barcodes, 40, 53–55, 57
Barnes & Noble, 19, 115, 116–117
BISG (Book Industry Study Group), 121
Books in Print, 13, 16, 104
Bowker, R. R. /MyIdentifiers.com, 3, 19, 32–35, 36, 38–45, 47–49, 121–122
bulk metadata management, 49
changes to content, 14–15, 17–18, 21, 26–27
changes to cover, 22
check digit, 25, 114, 119, 122
vs. copyright, 17, 25
on copyright page, 45–46, 68
costs of, 18–19, 19–20, 28–29, 30–35, 36, 40
CreateSpace, 12–13, 18–19, 19–20, 28–35
distributors & resellers, 10, 11, 12, 16, 21, 27, 36, 118
DRM (Digital Rights Management) and, 24
eBooks (electronic books), 11–12, 15, 16, 19, 20, 21–22, 24–25, 26–27, 115, 116, 117, 118
eISBN, 10, 15
foreign distribution, 22–23
foreign languages, 22
format of, 119
formats, book, 14
fundamentals of, 11–17
Google, 19
growth of, 3
Identifier, 86–87
imprints, 123
Ingram/IngramSpark, 18–19, 35–38
ISBN-10 vs. ISBN-13, 25–26, 46, 114–117
marketing, 16, 17, 20–21, 27, 45, 102–105
as metadata, 34, 48, 49, 102, 103–104
multiple publishers, 23
ONIX (ONline Information eXchange), 125
pBooks (print books), 10, 12–15, 15–16, 17–18, 116, 117
pre-assignment, 41–44
price data, 53–55, 57
print-on-demand (POD), 44–45
publishers, 12–13, 19–21, 23, 26, 40
registration of, 3, 5, 19, 30–35, 47–49, 113–114, 121–122. see also ISBN: assignment
reprints, 22
residency requirement, 23
resources on, 120
reuse of, 5, 15–16, 23
reviews and, 17–18
sectioning of text, 24–25
tracking with, 10
ISO (International Organization for Standardization), 25–26. see also standards, publishing
ISSN (International Standard Serial Number), 124. see also identification numbers

K
Kindle/Mobi, 14, 21–22, 115–116, 124–125. see also Amazon
Kobo, 19

L
LC-CIP data block, 83–84
LCCN (Library of Congress Control Number). see also identification numbers; PCN (Preassigned Control Number) program
advantages of, 83
eligibility for, 5
libraries, 83, 84
registration, 81, 85, 88–90
legal notices, copyright
fiction, 76
financial, 75
general, 72–74
medical, 75–76, 76–77
trademarks, 75
libraries
Baker & Taylor, 29–30, 31, 35
CIP (Cataloging in Publication) program, 80–81, 83–84, 90–93
ISBN (International Standard Book Number), 104
LC-CIP data block, 83–84
LCCN (Library of Congress Control Number), 83, 84
Libraries and Academic Institutions channel, 29–30
MARC (MAchine-Readable Cataloging) records, 93
marketing to, 31, 83–85, 104
P-CIP data block, 83–84, 90–93
SkyRiver, 93–94
WorldCat, 93, 126
Library of Congress Control Number (LCCN). see LCCN (Library of Congress Control Number)
Library of Congress (LoC). see LoC (Library of Congress)
Lightning Source, 30, 35. see also Ingram/IngramSpark
LoC (Library of Congress), 79–96
CIP (Cataloging in Publication) program, 80–81, 83–84, 90–93
copyright, 70
eligibility for, 79
LCCN (Library of Congress Control Number). see LCCN (Library of Congress Control Number)
PCN (Preassigned Control Number) program, 81–83, 85–890
Permanent Paper, 89–90

M
MARC (MAchine-Readable Cataloging) records, 93
marketing
Advance Reading Copies (ARCs), 37, 52, 54
discovery, 2–3, 88, 91, 102–105, 122–123, 125
imprints, 123
ISBN (International Standard Book Number), 16, 17, 20–21, 27, 45, 102–105
to libraries, 31, 83–85, 104
metadata. see metadata
SEO (Search Engine Optimization), 102–105, 125
metadata, 109–112. see also barcodes; copyright; identification numbers; marketing
accuracy of, 110–111
Bowker, R. R. /MyIdentifiers.com, 48
CIP (Cataloging in Publication) data record, 80–81
consistency of, 88, 95–96, 111
defined, 124
discovery, 88, 123
dissemination of, 111–112
ISBN (International Standard Book Number), 34, 48, 49, 102, 103–104
ISBN (International Standard Book Number) Identifier, 86–87
LC-CIP data block, 83–84
maintenance of, 112
management for bulk, 49
MARC (MAchine-Readable Cataloging) records, 93
optimization of, 112
P-CIP data block, 83–84, 90–93
PCN (Preassigned Control Number) program, 81–83, 85–88
recording of, 110
SEO (Search Engine Optimization), 102, 106–107
SkyRiver, 93–94
timing for, 111
Mobi/Kindle, 14, 21–22, 115–116, 124–125. see also EPUB
MyIdentifiers.com. see Bowker, R. R. /MyIdentifiers.com

N
Nook. see Barnes & Noble

O
OCLC (Online Computer Library Center), 126
ONIX (ONline Information eXchange), 125. see also standards, publishing

P
pBooks (print books)
Amazon. see Amazon
barcodes. see barcodes
Barnes & Noble, 29, 117
Books in Print, 13, 16, 104
CIP (Cataloging in Publication) program, 80–81, 83–84, 90–93
copyright. see copyright
Ingram/IngramSpark. see Ingram/IngramSpark
ISBN (International Standard Book Number), 10, 12–15, 15–16, 17–18, 116, 117
LCCN (Library of Congress Control Number). see LCCN (Library of Congress Control Number)
LoC (Library of Congress). see LoC (Library of Congress)
PCN (Preassigned Control Number) program, 81–83, 85–88
registration. see registration
P-CIP data block, 83–84, 90–93. see also CIP (Cataloging in Publication) program
PCN (Preassigned Control Number) program. see also CIP (Cataloging in Publication) program
copyright page, 82
costs, 81
eligibility for, 82–83
LCCN (Library of Congress Control Number), 5, 81, 83, 84, 85, 88–90
registration, 85–90
periodicals, 82–83, 124
Permanent Paper, 89–90
Preassigned Control Number (PCN) program. see PCN (Preassigned Control Number) program
print books. see pBooks (print books)
Printer’s Key, 70–71
print-on-demand (POD), 35–38, 44–45, 71, 89–90. see also CreateSpace; Ingram/IngramSpark
publishers. see also distributors & resellers
Advance Reading Copies (ARCs), 37, 52, 54
Amazon. see Amazon
Apple, 10, 19, 20, 117
Barnes & Noble, 10, 19, 29, 115, 116–117
bulk metadata management, 49
CIP (Cataloging in Publication) program, 80–81, 83–84, 90–93
on copyright page, 68–70, 82
Google, 19, 101–102
Green Press Initiative, 71–72
growth with, 3–4
imprints, 123
Ingram/IngramSpark. see Ingram/IngramSpark
ISBN (International Standard Book Number), 12–13, 19–21, 23, 26, 40
ISBN Identifier, 86–87
Kobo, 19
LC-CIP data block, 83–84
P-CIP data block, 83–84, 90–93
PCN (Preassigned Control Number) program, 81–83, 85–88
Permanent Paper, 89–90
Printer’s Key, 70–71
Smashwords, 19–20
timeline for, 98–99

R
registration, 1–8
advantages of, 2–3
barcodes, 51, 52, 55–56
Bowker, R. R. /MyIdentifiers.com. see Bowker, R. R. /MyIdentifiers.com
copyright, 59–65
ISBN (International Standard Book Number), 3, 5, 19, 32–35, 38–45, 47–49, 113–114, 121–122
LCCN (Library of Congress Control Number), 5, 85–90
PCN (Preassigned Control Number) program, 85–90
timeline for, 98–99
U.S. Customs Service, 61
reprints, 22
resources, 113–126
retailers & distributors. see distributors & resellers
reviews, book
Advance Reading Copies (ARCs), 37, 52, 54
ISBN (International Standard Book Number) and, 17–18

S
SEO (Search Engine Optimization), 101–108
Amazon vs. Google searches, 101–102
defined, 125–126
marketing, 102–105, 125
metadata, 102, 106–107
SkyRiver, 93–94
Smashwords, 19–20
software
DRM (Digital Rights Management), 24, 122
EPUB, 11, 21–22, 123
Mobi, 14, 21–22, 115–116, 124–125
Standard Book Numbering code. see ISBN (International Standard Book Number)
standards, publishing
BISG (Book Industry Study Group), 121
IDPF (International Digital Publishing Forum), 123
ISO (International Organization for Standardization), 25–26
ONIX (ONline Information eXchange), 125

T
trademarks, 75

U
UPC (Universal Product Code), 121, 126. see also identification numbers
URL (Uniform Resource Locator), 114–117, 126
U.S. Customs Service, 61

W
WorldCat, 93, 126

Hardcover, paperback or eBook; save 25% when ordering the hardcover + ISBN video series option.

Bulk purchase discounts available for writing and publishing organizations.

See Prices

Chapter Summaries

ISBNs

ISBNs

When you need one, registration tips, answers to 23 FAQs. Pros/Cons of the 4 CreateSpace options. ISBNs & SEO.

BARCODES

BARCODES

When you need one, when you don't. Barcode options for CreateSpace and IngramSpark POD printing.

COPYRIGHT

COPYRIGHT

Why and how to file a copyright, and a guide to completing your book's copyright page. 12 sample legal notices.

LCCNs

LCCNs

When and how to get a Library of Congress Control Number; why you might want a P-CIP data block. Is it worth the expense?

What the experts say

Laura Dawson, Numerical Gurus

“An essential guide to publishing identifiers, their benefits and uses, and (most importantly) what NOT to do. Required reading for every new entrant into book publishing..."

Kim Anderson, Founder and CEO, The Reading Room

“...a thorough and deceptively simple guide for independent authors and publishers to ensure they maximize the ability for their book to be discovered in the fire hose of new books published every year. I’ve no doubt it will become a bible for every aspiring author and publisher."

Carla King, Self-Pub Boot Camp

“Does your head hurt from hunting for answers for all of those pesky little questions you have about ISBNs, bar codes, copyright and library registration? David Wogahn has been my go-to guy for answers on this topic for years now, and I’m thrilled that he’s provided this information in one concise guide. Keep it close and proceed with confidence in spending your time and dollars to get it done right, the first time.”

Christine Pinheiro, President of Defiant Press

"This book is a must-have for any author who is considering the self-publishing route. Register Your Book demystifies the confusing labyrinth of copyright registration, ISBN selection, and marketing your book to libraries. Highly recommended."

Wendy Thomas Russell, Publisher and Co-Founder, Brown Paper Press

"The learning curve is so steep in this business. Sure, you could spend—and waste—dozens of hours figuring out how all this works. (That's what I did!) But why wouldn’t you just read Wogahn’s book?”

Buy direct, or from major retailers

eBook

$5

Paperback

$12

Hardcover Desk Reference

$19

  • Free shipping and no sales tax
  • Available direct from the publisher
  • Bulk purchase discounts available

Hardcover+Video Course

$29

  • Free shipping and no sales tax
  • Save 25%; video course alone is $27
  • Video: 57 min/10 Lessons (see below)

Learn more about the video course:

About the author

David Wogahn...

is the go-to expert in the rapidly expanding world of professional independent publishing. He has launched over one publishing imprints, resulting in the successful publication of 250 books...and counting. David is a Lynda.com author and his most recent book was Successful eBook Publishing.

A personal message to those new to publishing

"My goal is to help simplify the publication process. Registration is one of the few steps in book publishing in which mistakes and oversights are difficult and costly to correct. This book explains your options, advises possible courses of action, and will help you avoid the consequences of actions not taken."


Questions about your book? Schedule a call to discuss your specific book registration and metadata questions: